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Pork

Summer is here and that means grilling

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Summer is here and that means grilling

FINALLY! After a dreary spring and mild winter where mud was more prevalent that the shine of the sun. No need to dwell though, as summer is here now and it's time to fill the air with the scents of BBQ and grilled meat [and some veggies too— life is all about balance]. For our CSA members, June is the month of the grill and you'll have a great variety to play with, but we wanted to make sure you had a few ways to step up your grilling game and try some new things.

Burgers

Burgers don't just have to be patties with cheese on top [not that there's anything wrong with that!]. They can be great vehicles of flavor when different methods of cooking and seasoning are involved. Here are three tips to get you started, but feel free to add more to the comments section.

Fish Sauce

Are you crazy? Generally, the answer is yes, but in this particular case, no. Fish sauce is an umami bomb and when combined with smoke and char, it's pretty much the perfect bite. You can use any fish sauce, really, but if you're more adventurous, head to your nearest Asian market and look for some of the more obscure ones with the entire small fish packed in. You won't be disappointed. Simply drizzle some atop the burger and sit back and enjoy the umami explosion.

Clinching

  • Clinching is a method of cooking that trades the ease of a grill for the flavor of the coals. If you ever look at the traditional Argentinian-style cooking, this is a popular method of cooking all kinds of meat. What you want to do is create a nice hot bed of coals and then cook the meat directly on them. While I could go into detail explaining, this video by Adam Perry Lang describes it better than I can: http://www.weightwatchers.com/util/art/index_art.aspx?tabnum=1&art_id=214431&sc=3022   [ editors note: We are not advocates, nor haters, of Weight Watchers. We're simply using their video explain our suggestions.]

Low Temp

Low temp cooking is a new(ish) method that involves cooking meat or vegetables in water for a period of time that ensures even cooking throughout, without the risk of over- or under-done. This method allows you to take the burger and sear it hard in a hot pan or hot grill, or even with the above clinching method, and still avoid undercooking the meat. This will give you a beautiful blend of even doneness with a hard sear on the outside. Amazing flavor and texture is the result and more information on the method can be found here: ( http://anovaculinary.com/what-is-sous-vide/ ).

source:  Wikipedia  

source: Wikipedia 

 

Brats and Other Sausages

Low Heat

One of the common "issues" with cooking brats and sausages on the grill is that they break and/or split. More often than not, this is because they are placed under an extremely high heat, and the high temps cause the casing to contract to quickly and rip open. Some people are completely ok with the ripping, and if you're from the East Coast, you're well aware of "rippers" or deep-fried cased meats that "rip" open and are crispy and charred and delicious. For those that are not into the ripped casing, what you want to do is cook your meats on a low, indirect heat. A medium heat is likely fine as well, but you'll need to play around with your threshold based on the cased products you have. What you're looking for is a fully cooked-through brat that hasn't ripped. The cook time obviously varies by temperature of cooking environment, but indirect heat will give you a nice crisp, snappy casing and sausage.

Cook and Split

Growing up on the East Coast, we cooked our sausages a bit different than is typical here in Michigan, and quite frankly, most of the country. What we ended up doing was cooking our sausages half way through and then splitting them, or butterflying them, down the middle. From here you had a partially cooked and bound sausage that had these "rough" edges that were primed to take on a beautiful crispy char. So, here's how we do it. We cook the sausage over high heat for about 2 - 3 minutes per side. This allows the meat to set and bind up into something you can split without it becoming a Sloppy Joe-style mess. Once you've cooked both sides, remove from heat and slice down the middle, taking care not to slice through the other side of the casing, so that it butterflies out. At this point, flip and cook through over high heat on the exposed, split sides. This will yield a crispy and charred, albeit well done, brat that will be reminiscent of the East Coast boardwalk sausages.

Low Temp and Clinching

Low temp again. Yes, as you might guess, it's the same method as mentioned above and the benefits are exactly the same. By low temp cooking the sausages, you're cooking through, evenly, the cased meat, ensuring that the end product is an even doneness. By starting the cooking process this way, it opens up a couple of different options for finishing the cooking, one of which is any high heat method. Because you've cooked, and set, the sausages during low temp cooking, you can now sear and char over a very high heat without risk of the casing breaking into an unrecoverable mess. My preferred method of post-low temp cooking is clinching. As mentioned above, you'll be cooking directly on the cherry coals and utilizing the high heat to sear in flavor via char and smoke. With sausages, this is no different. Over hot, cherry, coals, place the low temp cooked sausage onto the coals and sear, hard, for one to one and half minutes per side. Remove from the coals, let rest and enjoy the most amazing sausage you've ever had.

All in all, cooking on the grill isn't rocket science. It is the most primitive and simplistic, of cooking methods. Wood/Coals, fire and food. It's been around since the dawn of time and our job as cooks is to leverage its inherent possibilities. Smoke, char and ash are all the elements that come to the table when cooking over fire. Hopefully we've given you some tips to take the ordinary into the extraordinary. Impress your friends with your new techniques and change the perception of what a "simple burger" or "Brat on a roll" can be.

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Spring Is Almost Here— And The Start of the CSA Season!

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Spring Is Almost Here— And The Start of the CSA Season!

We are so excited to kick off our CSA for the 3rd year, and even more excited to be heading out of the winter months and into one of the most beautiful seasons in Michigan, Spring. We're already hearing sandhill cranes in the distance, a multitude of songbirds have been visiting our feeders, and our horses are even starting to shed. The first day of spring is just 2 weeks away, so close we can taste it.

The taste of Spring is a good segue into this month's share, as we'll be kicking it off with what we do best. Pork, pork and more pork. Warm weather isn't reliably here yet, so we're not going the grilling products just yet either.  Instead, we're going to be providing a beautiful pork roast for you to cook up for you and your family. As such, we wanted to provide you with two recipe options for the roast, both sure to be a crowd pleaser for you and your family.

Pork Roasts

Pork Roasts

 

Slow Roasted Pork

  • 2 tbsp Brown or Maple Sugar
  • 2 tbsp Salt
  • 2 tbsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tbsp paprika
  • 1 tbsp cumin
  • 1/2 - 3/4 cup of good dijon mustard
  • 1 - (4 - 8 lb) pork roast
  1. Preheat your oven to 225 degrees
  2. Place a rack inside a roasting pan or cast iron skillet
  3. Brush pork generously with mustard.
  4. Blend or mix spices well and sprinkle generously all over pork roast
  5. Cook approximately 30 - 45 minutes per pound, until you reach an internal temperature of 130 - 135 degrees.

    * historically the FDA has suggested cooking pork to 150 to avoid trichinosis. Not only has there been no cases of trichinosis from pork in dozens of years, but that temperature absolutely destroys the meat. Our preference is to cook to the range above, allowing for some carry-over cooking to have the final temperature end at 135 - 140, slightly pink in appearance.
     
  6. Baste the roast with the released juices every hour or so.
  7. Remove from oven and let rest for 15 - 20 minutes.
  8. Serve with some roast vegetables, or better yet, creamy grits.

Whiskey Braised Pork

  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp fresh ground black pepper (or to taste)
  • 1/2 tsp coarse ground mustard seeds or dry mustard powder
  • 1 tsp brown sugar
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 Sprigs fresh Thyme
  • 4 Cloves Garlic, Rough Chopped
  • 3 of your favorite root vegetables, rough chopped (carrots, onions, parsnips, etc.)
  • 1-1/2 Cups Rye Whiskey
  • 2 Quarts Chicken or Pork Broth. If you don't have broth, use water and amp up seasonings a bit.
  • 1/4 cup olive or vegetable oil
  1. Generously season the pork roast with salt, pepper and brown sugar.
  2. Heat heavy-bottomed pot on medium-high heat and add in oil, as well as preheat oven to 325 degrees.
  3. Sear all sides of pork to a deep brown, taking care to not let it burn, but still develop a deep brown crust.
  4. Remove pork from pot and set aside.
  5. Add in rough chopped vegetables and sauté until caramelized, about 5 - 7 minutes.
  6. Add in garlic and thyme and stir until fragrant
  7. Remove pot from flame and add in whiskey. Stirring well to scrape up all the brown bits off the bottom of the pot. Reduce whiskey by half.
  8. Add back in pork roast along with broth or water and bay leaf, making sure to cover roast about 1/3 - 1/2 way up.
  9. Cover and roast in oven until temperature reads 130 - 135 degrees.
  10. Remove from oven and let rest for 15 - 20 minutes.
  11. While meat is resting, strain pan juices and skim off any fat. Add back to pot and reduce by half.
  12. Slice and serve with grits, rice or wilted greens. Top with reduced pan juices.

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Hot off the Grill - It's the May CSA

It's grill time people. IT'S GRILL TIME!!!! This month's share celebrates this by bringing you products that are meant to get you outside and over that open flame. IMG_3054

First up, the beef. In this month's share, you'll find some burger patties that are flat-out delicious with just salt and pepper, but also a flank steak. The most common use for flank steak is fajitas. While fajitas are a perfectly fine preparation, with a little bit of work and awareness of how to cut the steak, you can create a grilled steak that everyone will love. When cooking flank steak, we simply use salt and pepper, but this steak is well suited for any marinade or rub. When you're ready to cook, generously season the meat and then cook over a high heat for only a couple of minutes per side (depends on thickness of course). You want to be sure to not overcook the meat, as it has the potential to get tough if given the opportunity. You're also going to want to ensure adequate resting time, generally about the same amount of time that you took to cook the steak. Once well rested, slice the meat and serve to your family and/or guests. It's not your standard slicing though, as you're going to want to slice it -across- the grain to help tenderize the cuts. Here is a good video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_WF-aUCOCk

Once you're all set with the cutting, there's nothing left to do but open a beer or a bottle of wine and enjoy the beautiful weather.

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Pork chops are probably the best grilled item on a pig, at least in my opinion. They have great marbling (at least ours do ;) ), a nice fat cap and don't take too long to cook. That's where people go wrong with pork chops though— they overcook them. This country has been told for so long to cook pork to 150 or 160 or even higher, but really, the optimal temperature in our opinion is about 135-140. They'll be just a little bit pink in the center and absolutely perfectly juicy. With this being the first opportunity to try pork raised our way, I suggest using the opportunity to just do salt and pepper for seasoning so that you can clearly taste the difference. As for cooking, you're looking at 3 - 4 minutes per side for a room temperature pork chop and the same rules as above for resting. After that, slice and enjoy with a nice spring salad or even some smashed potatoes. There really is no wrong side when it comes to pork chops, so just enjoy the flavor with whatever you enjoy on the side.

Please remember that the fat on this pork is not the fat you know from the grocery store!  These pigs were finished on barley, which makes their fat snow-white, softer, more flavorful [some would say "nutty"]— you may even notice that it looks and feels different on your hands as you prepare it.  You may be tempted to cut the fat off, but this fat is partially unsaturated, like olive oil.  It's good and good for ya!  If nothing else, you can save it and use it when you're cooking something else, to grease your skillet or flavor a soup.  But, you might find that you like it just as it is, on the chop as part of the bite.

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Meat CSA - April Recipes

I'm sure everyone else is as excited about the arrival of Spring as we are. While it now means a few weeks of mud season, it's far more enjoyable to be outside and working with the animals. It also means that we can start to think a bit more about grilling. Grilling means a lot of things, but when we think of grilling, we think of a perfectly seared steak. We kick off the start of the grilling season with the addition of some beautiful ribeye steaks. The smell and sound of the steak hitting the roaring hot grill is one of the most distinctive pleasures of cooking. The sizzle, the smoke, it embodies everything about that's great about cooking outside. steak

Cooking a great steak isn't difficult, but it does require a few key steps to ensure proper doneness and tenderness. This is especially true for the members receiving the 100% grass fed steaks, as they can quickly go from perfect to tough if you aren't paying attention. Here are a few tips and hints to getting the perfect steak.

1. Get your grill roaring hot. If you have the ability to use a cast iron grill, definitely use that, as it transfers heat much better than the typical stainless grill that most are accustomed to. If not, no big deal, as the main thing is to get your grill screaming hot.

2. Generously pre-salt your meat about 60 minutes prior to cooking and leave out on the counter, allowing the meat to come to room temperature. This will allow the salt to penetrate the meat, rather than just being a surface seasoning. 

3. When you're ready to cook, you're going to lay that steak down on the grill an do -NOT- move until you're ready to flip. For rare beef, we typically cook about 3 minutes each side. On average, you'll cook grass-fed beef about 30% less time than grain-fed/supplemented . If you're a fan of well-done meat, you're going to want to cook this meat in some sort of a liquid, as it'll just toughen up far too much to be tasty if grilled to that level of doneness.

Here is a quick guide to test doneness in your meat.  Hold your thumb and finger/s together as pictured, and feel each stage of cooking:

Temperature Test

*for those folks receiving the beef that has had free choice access to grain, you'll follow the exact same directions, just allowing for a slightly longer cooking time.

Chorizo and Eggs

In addition to ribeyes, you'll also find some chorizo, a chuck roast and ground beef. Here are some great recipes for those items as well.

Frittata with Chard and Chorizo

Braised Beef with Red Onion Gremolata

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March CSA - Pork Shank and Top Round Recipes

It's been a long cold winter and the start of the CSA means we're that much closer to spring, and we couldn't be more excited. We're not out of the winter woods yet, so this month's share has those stick-to-your-bones ingredients in the hopes of helping you stay warm until Spring decides to make an appearance. You hear us talk a lot about "value cuts" and the importance of utilizing the whole animal. These cuts don't always get a lot of love at the meat counter, but they have a great deal of flavor, plus in some cases the beautiful addition of gelatin [i.e. the stuff that makes soup or the trendy "bone broth" so delicious]. We kicked off the season squarely supporting this whole-animal philosophy, adding in pork shanks for the first edition of the small shares. These shanks are huge and are some of my favorite cuts on the animal. For the best use, you're going to combine three methods of cooking: searing, braising and broiling. It sounds like a lot of work, but I can assure you, it's not. This is a simple dish that's perfect for a cold day, and will give you a good deal of leftovers for the rest of the week.

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Now onto the second recipe, the top round. The top round was in all the shares this month and is a great introduction into the world of grass-fed beef if you're unfamiliar with it. While you've invariably had beef before, grass-fed beef is, well, a different animal than what you typically find in stores. The cows tend to be older so that they put on more weight (also more flavor), and they also tend to be a bit more lean. Because of this, you need to take some care when cooking so that you can avoid having meat that is too tough. For the top round, we're going to do a simple roast, cooked to medium-rare and sliced thinly. You can pair this with roasted veggies, mashed potatoes or even atop a salad if you wish. Lets get to the recipe.

[yumprint-recipe id='27']

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Passion Fruit Margarita

After a week of cooking and a long day at work we found ourselves with a number of leftovers— high quality leftovers in the beautiful slow cooked ham with cider, cloves, apples and spring onions.  While the food was perfectly fall, we decided to treat ourselves to a little tropical excursion with a Passion Fruit Margarita made with all fresh ingredients and something kinda yummy. While we were eating leftovers as our main course, we did manage to incorporate some new foods as we whipped out some homemade crackers we got at the last food swap, some fresh cheese and home-cured bresaola.  You can learn more about my meat curing over at Eat the Pig if you’d like …

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Slow Cooked Ham with Whiskey Sours

Slow Cooked Ham

Today we made a delicious slow cooked ham in the crockpot braised for approximately 8 hours. The ham was cooked with apples, onions, rosemary, honey and a mixture of chicken broth and cider as a braising liquid. The finished product was absolutely delicious being fall off the bone tender, a nice blend of salty and sweet.

The final product was shredded and served over rice with the onions and apples as accompaniments, and covered with a couple of ladles of broth over top of it. It was topped with some alder smoked salt to finish it off. All in all one hell of a meal.

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