Viewing entries tagged
Braised

Spring Is Almost Here— And The Start of the CSA Season!

Comment

Spring Is Almost Here— And The Start of the CSA Season!

We are so excited to kick off our CSA for the 3rd year, and even more excited to be heading out of the winter months and into one of the most beautiful seasons in Michigan, Spring. We're already hearing sandhill cranes in the distance, a multitude of songbirds have been visiting our feeders, and our horses are even starting to shed. The first day of spring is just 2 weeks away, so close we can taste it.

The taste of Spring is a good segue into this month's share, as we'll be kicking it off with what we do best. Pork, pork and more pork. Warm weather isn't reliably here yet, so we're not going the grilling products just yet either.  Instead, we're going to be providing a beautiful pork roast for you to cook up for you and your family. As such, we wanted to provide you with two recipe options for the roast, both sure to be a crowd pleaser for you and your family.

Pork Roasts

Pork Roasts

 

Slow Roasted Pork

  • 2 tbsp Brown or Maple Sugar
  • 2 tbsp Salt
  • 2 tbsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tbsp paprika
  • 1 tbsp cumin
  • 1/2 - 3/4 cup of good dijon mustard
  • 1 - (4 - 8 lb) pork roast
  1. Preheat your oven to 225 degrees
  2. Place a rack inside a roasting pan or cast iron skillet
  3. Brush pork generously with mustard.
  4. Blend or mix spices well and sprinkle generously all over pork roast
  5. Cook approximately 30 - 45 minutes per pound, until you reach an internal temperature of 130 - 135 degrees.

    * historically the FDA has suggested cooking pork to 150 to avoid trichinosis. Not only has there been no cases of trichinosis from pork in dozens of years, but that temperature absolutely destroys the meat. Our preference is to cook to the range above, allowing for some carry-over cooking to have the final temperature end at 135 - 140, slightly pink in appearance.
     
  6. Baste the roast with the released juices every hour or so.
  7. Remove from oven and let rest for 15 - 20 minutes.
  8. Serve with some roast vegetables, or better yet, creamy grits.

Whiskey Braised Pork

  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp fresh ground black pepper (or to taste)
  • 1/2 tsp coarse ground mustard seeds or dry mustard powder
  • 1 tsp brown sugar
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 Sprigs fresh Thyme
  • 4 Cloves Garlic, Rough Chopped
  • 3 of your favorite root vegetables, rough chopped (carrots, onions, parsnips, etc.)
  • 1-1/2 Cups Rye Whiskey
  • 2 Quarts Chicken or Pork Broth. If you don't have broth, use water and amp up seasonings a bit.
  • 1/4 cup olive or vegetable oil
  1. Generously season the pork roast with salt, pepper and brown sugar.
  2. Heat heavy-bottomed pot on medium-high heat and add in oil, as well as preheat oven to 325 degrees.
  3. Sear all sides of pork to a deep brown, taking care to not let it burn, but still develop a deep brown crust.
  4. Remove pork from pot and set aside.
  5. Add in rough chopped vegetables and sauté until caramelized, about 5 - 7 minutes.
  6. Add in garlic and thyme and stir until fragrant
  7. Remove pot from flame and add in whiskey. Stirring well to scrape up all the brown bits off the bottom of the pot. Reduce whiskey by half.
  8. Add back in pork roast along with broth or water and bay leaf, making sure to cover roast about 1/3 - 1/2 way up.
  9. Cover and roast in oven until temperature reads 130 - 135 degrees.
  10. Remove from oven and let rest for 15 - 20 minutes.
  11. While meat is resting, strain pan juices and skim off any fat. Add back to pot and reduce by half.
  12. Slice and serve with grits, rice or wilted greens. Top with reduced pan juices.

Comment

Comment

March CSA - Pork Shank and Top Round Recipes

It's been a long cold winter and the start of the CSA means we're that much closer to spring, and we couldn't be more excited. We're not out of the winter woods yet, so this month's share has those stick-to-your-bones ingredients in the hopes of helping you stay warm until Spring decides to make an appearance. You hear us talk a lot about "value cuts" and the importance of utilizing the whole animal. These cuts don't always get a lot of love at the meat counter, but they have a great deal of flavor, plus in some cases the beautiful addition of gelatin [i.e. the stuff that makes soup or the trendy "bone broth" so delicious]. We kicked off the season squarely supporting this whole-animal philosophy, adding in pork shanks for the first edition of the small shares. These shanks are huge and are some of my favorite cuts on the animal. For the best use, you're going to combine three methods of cooking: searing, braising and broiling. It sounds like a lot of work, but I can assure you, it's not. This is a simple dish that's perfect for a cold day, and will give you a good deal of leftovers for the rest of the week.

[yumprint-recipe id='26'] 

Now onto the second recipe, the top round. The top round was in all the shares this month and is a great introduction into the world of grass-fed beef if you're unfamiliar with it. While you've invariably had beef before, grass-fed beef is, well, a different animal than what you typically find in stores. The cows tend to be older so that they put on more weight (also more flavor), and they also tend to be a bit more lean. Because of this, you need to take some care when cooking so that you can avoid having meat that is too tough. For the top round, we're going to do a simple roast, cooked to medium-rare and sliced thinly. You can pair this with roasted veggies, mashed potatoes or even atop a salad if you wish. Lets get to the recipe.

[yumprint-recipe id='27']

Comment